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A Crime against nature Selling African elephants related to critics of corruption concerns:

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A Crime against nature Selling African elephants related to critics of corruption concerns:

A crime against nature Selling African elephants related to critics of corruption concerns. An auction of 170 African elephants could be a smokescreen for a done deal or related to corruption. Namibia is calling for proposals for wild animals. Saying there are too many in the region, and citing growing conflicts with humans. The authorities demand that every foreign buyer must demonstrate that. They can provide quarantine facilities and have permission from the conservation authorities in their home country.

But wildlife experts, worried by the auction, say that the number of elephants in the region is dwindling, and these herds are “transnational” – they are moving through the country, so they are not for sale in Namibia. Last year, 10 elephants that had crossed into agricultural areas were shot by wildlife chiefs. Damaging crops during the harvest season.

However, Stakeholders had agreed to keep elephants away from crops. By building electric fences, elephant corridors, and water points at a distance from villages. Before the Friday auction scheduled, AllAfrica.com reported. But the government said it was not aware of the suggestions.

Over 350 elephants found dead near water holes in neighboring Botswana:

National Park Rescue, a charity that defends African parks from poaching, says it worries that the sale may be a way to justify an already scheduled cull, with lucrative hunts and ivory already sold to hunters, or that the government may already have lined up a sale of the animals to a game reserve, with crop-raiding arguments and an excuse. 

The charity based in Zimbabwe and registered in the UK believes that it also suspects that the sale could be a bid to raise elephant-hating farmers’ votes; or that the sale is about clearing land for cattle farming groups or oil companies. Over 350 elephants found dead near water holes in neighboring Botswana last year. Algae toxins have blamed.

In 29 African countries, elephants are now extinct and those struggling to survive are under increasing threat from the ongoing explosion of human populations, poaching, and greed by the government, NPR says. In 100 years about 95% of African elephants slaughtered and 10% of survivors are killed annually. This auction is seen as a serious crime against nature by conservationists.

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